The long, winding, and mostly uphill, road. Boente to Calzada (14.3 km/8.9 miles)

Farmland that we saw today.
Farmland that we saw today.

Roman bridge at Ribadiso.

We have learned that when our tour escort, Ignacio, says that the route is “mostly flat” that means, ‘mostly uphill.’ Lord only knows what he means when he says that it is steep!

We had a lovely walk today that took us by an ancient hospital (hostel) for pilgrims that has been recently renovated in Ribadiso Da Baixo. We crossed a Roman bridge to get this point which was our first check point of the day.

It seems that much of the paths are uphill (with very few downhills…go figure).

Many of our paths resembled this one today.
Many of our paths resembled this one today.

The kicker occurs when you finish a climb, only to find that you must round a corner for another uphill excursion. All I can say is that my doctor will be thrilled that I am doing so much walking; truthfully, I am surprised at how well I am doing. The path in the picture may look flat, but don’t be fooled, it keeps rising, and rising, and rising. The wonderful thing is that we walked in the shade much of the time.

At our second checkpoint, we were anxious for a snack from the back of the bus, but to our shock, there wasn’t anything in the back of the bus. Ignacio and Francisco surprised us with an impromtu picnic for our second checkpoint. They provided a lovely repast for us and there was enough shade on the stone wall to accommodate all of us.

Ignacio (far left) and Francisco (far right) display their picnic for us.
Ignacio (far left) and Francisco (far right) display their picnic for us.

As we ate our lunch, we noticed a farmer working in a field nearby. He would take his small tractor and collect a large, round bale of hay and haul it up the Pilgrim’s path. He did this at least four or five times during our lunch. When Kris and I set out on that same path, we ran into him as he was coming back for another bale of hay. We stopped walking and stepped to the far side of the road for him to pass and we waved to him as he drove by. What was so charming was that after his tractor passed us, he looked back, waved and flashed a smile while shouting, “Buen Camino.”

Our day ended with a visit to the Honey Museum and Bee Farm, which is not far from our current lodging, Casa Brandariz. One of the staff led us through the exhibits and allowed us to sample some of their honey. We ended our day with another marvelous dinner.

The Honey Museum. The flowers on the property were unforgettable. They also had a small herb garden which smelled wonderful.
The Honey Museum. The flowers on the property were unforgettable. They also had a small herb garden which smelled wonderful.

 

2 Comments

  1. Kim Halverson

    Hi Brother Bob & Kris,
    I just read your Pilgramage blog to the Santiago Shrine. What an unbelievable journey the 2 of you are on and am impressed with the endurance and strong will to continue each day to this destination. I remember watching “The Way” at retreat and being moved by Tom and the others on this tough terrain. God speed and I will pray for both of you and look forward to a report the first week in Oct during our retreat weekend!
    God bless, Kim Halverson

    • Brother Bob

      Kim, thank you for the kind remarks, and for reading my blog in the first place. It’s hard to describe how walking the Way affects you for the good. Yesterday, both Kris and I were reflecting on all of the blessings that we have received in our lives. The paths are not easy, even in our shortened form of the Camino, but they are profound, nonetheless. The goodness and the kindness of the farmers we meet along the paths, as well as our fellow pilgrims is heart-warming & uplifting. We reach Santiago the day after tomorrow. Bro Bob

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